CalPhotos canada goose branta

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canada gé trillium parkall> Branta canadensis
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canada goose branta

goedkope Canadese gans
canada goose jacket Reino Unido
billiga jackor
imagens de ganso
Canadese gans

CANADIAN GEESE.

Every once in a while the question “Canada goose or Canadian goose?” is used as yet another pedantic shibboleth, and I am pleased to find a birding page by Lisa Shea that addresses the issue with good sense and as scientific an attitude as any linguist could ask:

The vast majority of English speaking people call the goose that is large and has a black head—Branta canadensis—a Canadian Goose. However, its original name was a CANADA Goose.
Remember, the official name for any bird is its Latin name. So the “real” name for this creature is Branta canadensis. That’s because the bird probably has 200 different names in 200 different languages, based on its colors, its sounds, its habitat or many other reasons. Birds get named after people, after habits, after all sorts of things. The Latin name is the same around the world for that bird.
So it’s true that at one point in time the Branta canadensis was called a Canada Goose, because it was often seen flying towards Canada and living there. You could now just as easily call it a North American Goose since it is found all over North America and lives just about anywhere. It has adapted to live all across the US and into Mexico too.
So over the years, the name has changed to be Canadian Goose in English. Just like people in the 1600s used to call pumpkins “Pompions” and call vegetables “potherbs”, we have changed what we typically call the Branta canadensis to Canadian Goose.

In Canada, by the way, francophones call it bernache du Canada. (Via a typically thorough and well-informed comment by Dan Hartung.)

Comments

  1. John Salmon says:

    Thanks for your comment on Ball Four-actually I had never really doubted that Bouton had written the book, but I’ve heard the allegation that he hadn’t so often that I began to wonder.
    You’ll notice I have Language Hat in my links (under Language/Literature) and I have a couple entries of yours linked in my Jan. 4 post. (Of course I’m not looking for a reciporical {sic} link as mine isn’t a language site but I wanted to mention the links!)

  2. qB says:

    The species was introduced long ago to Great Britain (and other parts of mainland Europe) and is very well established. But in this minority dialect of English it is a Canada goose, and is so named in all my many and various bird books. I’ve never seen or heard of it referred to as a Canadian goose.

  3. Cryptic Ned says:

    I don’t know if the opinion of people who are actually birdwatchers and ornithologists matters for this discussion, but none of them/us call it a “Canadian goose” either.
    At least in North America, the names of vertebrates are standardized by species. If you called the Canada goose the Black-Necked Goose or something, people wouldn’t know what you meant outside your dialect.

  4. language hat says:

    I don’t know if the opinion of people who are actually birdwatchers and ornithologists matters for this discussion
    Sure it does. This may be one of those situations where specialists use one term and the general public another. Or Lisa Shea may be wrong about majority use; I certainly wouldn’t know, not having much occasion to talk about the species. (When I see geese flying overhead, I just say “Geese!”)

  5. wolfangel says:

    I have never in my life heard Canadian goose; since I am, in terms of actual lexical items, a prescriptivist at heart, I think it sounds wrong. (I think Canadian geese, as a plural, is less wrong sounding.)
    I would likely have thought it was a different (but related or similar-looking) species of goose. For what it’s worth.
    I suspect that different areas have different majority usages.

  6. Murph says:

    Seems like an American (as in US) wrote the article. Here in Anglophone Canada, it’s Canada Goose. Don’t know if they call it that in Newfoundland, but the rest of the Maritimes and all the way across to the Pacific, I’ve only ever heard the one. When I lived in Utah, though, I did hear Canadian Geese used as a term once or twice.
    D

  7. Nao says:

    I live in the US, and I’ve never heard them called anything but Canada Geese. And that goes for newspaper articles and, I think, radio shows, as well as talking to birders. Just another data point. I think I would have noticed “Canadian Geese” because it just sounds weird to me.

  8. dale says:

    I don’t think I’ve heard “Canadian Goose” either, though the birds are regulars here in Oregon, and we do commonly talk about “Canada Geese.” We’re not birdwatchers particularly, & certainly not ornithologists. I don’t think we’d really know one species of Goose from another; we’d call any goose that wasn’t in a barnyard a “Canada Goose.”

  9. marian says:

    FWIW, another Canadian Person writing in to give the thumbs-up to Canada Goose. I would correct, and possibly scoff at anyone who called it otherwise (except for the Latin).

  10. DaninVan says:

    I’ve only ever heard them called Canada Goose (or Geese)…except when they crap on you whilst flying overhead.

  11. zod says:

    One more Canuck in the mix, to add my voice. Fuck “Canadian Goose”, who uses that?

  12. Kerim Friedman says:

    Here is the answer to another important question:
    Just what is the airspeed velocity of an unladen swallow?

  13. noonless says:

    Great White Goose!

  14. DaninVan says:

    “Great White Goose!” Do you mean Snowgeese? (Chen caerulescens)

  15. noonless says:

    Great White Northern Goose!

  16. DaninVan says:

    I’m ‘challenging’ you on that one.
    There’s a Greater White-fronted Goose (Anser albifrons).*
    *’Birds of North America’ K. Kaufman
    ………there may be a connection with language there somewhere.

  17. language hat says:

    I’m bothered enough by the consensus for “Canada goose” in this thread that I’ve e-mailed Lisa Shea to ask what she bases her statement about the “vast majority” saying “Canadian” on, but I haven’t heard back so far.

  18. DaninVan says:

    Canada Goose:
    http://www.audubon.org/bird/BoA/BOA_index.html

  19. PF says:

    To break the consensus, this DC/Virginian says “Canadian Goose” only and ever.

  20. language hat says:

    Aha! The wall of conspiracy cracks!

  21. DaninVan says:

    Please excuse PF’s quick departure, he had to take his Great Danish for a walk.

  22. cannylinguist says:

    Another data point: When I have seen the Branta canadensis (assuming that is what they are) bringing traffic to a halt so they may leisurely cross the roads that wind through the Boston fens (you know, LH, the ones that are next to that park), everyone around me has always called them Canada geese, perhaps with an expletive incorporated if they’re in a hurry to get somewhere.

  23. Sue says:

    Less than three weeks ago, in a park in Birmingham, England, I was surrounded by native Brits (perhaps five adults, from Dover, Brum and Bradford) who spontaneously called the birds “Canadian Geese” – I didn’t reply that the proper term was “Canada Geese” but was very surprised that the birds were there at all.

  24. iain says:

    Surprised at Canada Geese in Birmingham!
    They are a well known pest in city parks in parts of England, particularly because they make a horrible mess of the grass eith their grazing and shitting.
    Here in SE Scotland I’ve only heard of Canada Geese

  25. kerin gordon says:

    Okay..I came upon a post in amazon.com for a review of the book ‘Lab 257’ who stated:
    “…he repeatedly referred to the presence of and migratory habits of “Canadian geese”. Mr. Carroll there are no such animals. Canada geese are named after the Native American Canada tribe. These birds are not named after the country of Canada and cannot correctly be referred to as “a Canadian Air Force”. You would think that a dedicated investigative reporter obsessed with accuracy and getting things right, who claims to have interviewed many birders, would have been informed that Canada geese and not “Canadian geese” fly the skies of Plum Island. What other major details in the story are as eggregiously slipshod? It made me wonder. Who edited this book?”
    The review written prior to that had stated, “…the Canadian geese inaccuracy is pretty disturbing. Didn’t this guy talk to any real biologists/birders?”
    Okay..I got a little heated over these moronic statements. Gee is moronic even a word? Well this book was written about an area on Long Island. Actually my father worked at the place the book was about. He always referred to the birds as “Canadian Geese.” So did his parents and entire family who were also members of the Audubon Society. But why stop there?
    I just spoke to the following individuals:
    A customer in Philly (that’s Philadelphia for the mentally challenged reading this post).
    A person living in Prague called it a Goose from North America.
    The responses recieved from the following sources were all the same:
    Tucson Audubon Society
    Wild Bird Store(Canada Division)
    Wild Bird Store (Tucson)
    AZ Game & Fish(Tucson)-not geniuses to begin with
    Wild Birds Unlimited (Tucson)
    University of Arizona Dept. of Ecol. & Evol. Bio.
    International Wildlife Museum (Tucson)
    (…….not too mention online searches!)
    THESE ARE THE RESULTS IF YOU CAN HANDLE THEM (AND THEY ARE ALL PRETTY MUCH THE SAME {AS ME}:
    1.Canadian Geese
    2.Canada Goose
    3.Goose
    4.Branta canadensis
    Furthermore, it was mentioned by half of the respondents and myself that it would be
    improper/sound strange to say “Canada Geese” based on the phrases:
    “Canada Hockey Team” vs. “Canadian Hockey Team”.
    While they are both correct..gramatically speaking, one does sound more appropriate.
    When questioned about the usage of “Canada Goose”, the results were split. Of course either name would be correct, though half would have choosen the term “Canada Goose” while the remaining would simply use the word “Goose”.
    I have found no evidence of a Native American Indian Tribe (not to mention my Native American neighbors have not either. The one post where I saw that the Canada(ian) Goose was named after a person seemed to be based on his opinion only.
    Unfortunately I had other things to do then waste my time on this…but I just happened to stumble on this board and this reponse was created for the idiot on Amazon.com.
    Lastly, since the book was about a town on Long Island, the author is correct in using the terminology used by the people living in that area. To use the lingo not common for that area would make the author seem more distant from his research. If it was common to call the geese a swan..then he should use that terminology with a footnote.
    The first reviewer had an excuse..he was from N.J. We don’t expect much from them to begin with. Although while traveling in Pa. once, I did come upon a family at a general store (who used a TORO for transportation), and asked them for directions on how to get back on the main highway just past the chain link fence behind the store. Their response? “We never did travel on that road before.” {I guess the TORO just ain’t fast enuff for that there road.} Apparently NY’ers either have the monopoly on being flawless with their opinions while everyone else who is blessed to be in their presence is drowning in a sea of unconscience ignorance.
    Lastlee…langgwije iz usd 2 transfur thawts. If I saa sum’im n u ken unnnerstan it..I did mi job. If u ax mee sum’im n I dont unnerstan whatya saa’un..then that iz uh delemma.
    :-}~~~~

  26. Roger H says:

    “Furthermore, it was mentioned by half of the respondents and myself that it would be
    improper/sound strange to say “Canada Geese” based on the phrases:
    “Canada Hockey Team” vs. “Canadian Hockey Team”.
    While they are both correct..gramatically speaking, one does sound more appropriate.”
    Well, it’s incorrect to compare Canada Geese with the Canadian Hockey Team. The name of the Goose IS the “Canada Goose” and not just a Goose from Canada – the plural of Goose is Geese, so more than one Canada Goose are Canada Geese – you generally never pluralize (or change the tense of) the describing adjectives when they are all part of the noun itself.
    So, it ‘should’ be Canada Geese regardless of what sounds better.
    R

  27. Acey Tharrington says:

    I’ve said Canadian geese. I still say it. I was told that the correct way to say this is Canada goose. If that is right, a person from a country, such as Iran, would be called an Iran person instead of Iranian.

  28. Acey Tharrington says:

    All I know is, the white ones bite.

  29. marie-lucie says:

    Decades spent in English Canada, I say Canada goose/geese like everyone I know. “Canadian geese” would refer to the several species of geese spending at least part of their time in Canada, including the farm-raised ones.

    In French the official name is (la) bernache du Canada as opposed to similar species in other continents, but in everyday conversation simply (la) bernache.

  30. Ø says:

    Did you know that there’s a Canadian River in Kansas? It goes nowhere near Canada. It’s a tributary of the Arkansas River. Also, along much of its length the Arkansas River is pronounced to rhyme with Kansas rather than like the state of Arkansas.

  31. Bill W says:

    Actually, the Canadian River doesn’t run through Kansas–it runs even further south. It rises in New Mexico, flows through the Texas Panhandle, and joins the Arkansas River (yes, Ar ‘kan sas, not ‘Ar kan saw) River in Oklahoma.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_River

  32. marie-lucie says:

    Canada goose, Iran person

    The Canada goose is one species of goose, found notably in Canada but also in other places. Canadian geese are all the geese in Canada, not just the ones called Canada geese. I don’t think there is more than one species of humans in Iran.

  33. John Cowan says:

    It’s the ArKANsas River in Oklahoma and Kansas, but the ARKansaw in Arkansaw, er, Arkansas. Colorado usage is divided. I don’t know what Mexicans call it: it was part of the international border from 1821 to 1848.

  34. Bill W says:

    “It’s the ArKANsas River in Oklahoma and Kansas, but the ARKansaw in Arkansaw, er, Arkansas.”

    I’m a person of Okie heritage. ArKANsas.

  35. Michelle says:

    I live in southern Oregon and this very topic was a point of discussion a couple of nights ago. I was enjoying a beautiful evening on the river with my boyfriend and some friends when someone pointed and exclaimed “Oh! Look at the Canadian geese!” That made me wonder if the phrase should’ve been “Oh! Look at the Canada geese!” Since the geese aren’t true “residents” of Canada, I’m leaning toward the term Canada geese.

    I hear people in Oregon refer to “Canadian geese” frequently.

  36. JW Calloway says:

    Hogwash! Come out with all the reasons you can dream up to call them Canadian geese and they are all wrong.

    Canadians are people that are considered to be residents of Canada. Geese are residents, but not people. Some have said here that the term Canada geese is outdated and they are properly called Canadian geese. That is rubbish and incorrect.

    It doesn’t matter if they are in Canada or not they are Canada geese. How could you in any way call the species that may happen to be in the United States, or elsewhere “Canadians”?

  37. Lisa B. says:

    Here in New Jersey, most people I come across say Canadian geese.

  38. Joy says:

    http://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2015/04/canada-goose.html

  39. CN says:

    I’ll just add that in the nearly 30 years I spent in Pennsylvania, I never once heard “Canada Goose”. It was always “Canadian.”

    I’ll take common usage over pedantry anytime.

  40. languagehat says:

    I’ll take common usage over pedantry anytime.

    You and me both!

  41. marie-lucie says:

    I’ll take common usage over pedantry anytime.

    A sound attitude, but “common usage” often varies according to country or region, as demonstrated in this very thread. It’s an “I say tomato, you say tomahto” situation.

  42. Brett Altschul says:

    I have lived in places where “Canada Goose” was the norm, and other places where it was “Canadian Goose.” I’m not sure I can remember which regions used which names though.

  43. Bathrobe says:

    J W Calloway’s comment is so misguided as to be laughable. What would he have to say about German cockroaches?

  44. Lynn says:

    I am absolutely amazed that people (in the U.S. no less!) have never heard these birds called Canadian geese! I have never heard it any other way, my whole life! When I first saw Canada geese written somewhere, I thought it was yet another example of our language being ruined!

  45. John Cowan says:

    Just as I’ve learned to accept that there are people who have never heard any term but Welsh rarebit, and if they heard Welsh rabbit would think it absurd.

  46. Y says:

    To me, a frequent observer and appreciator of that bird, Canadian goose sounds as wrong as saying Southern Africa when referring to South Africa. A Canadian goose is to me any goose which happens to be Canadian.

    If it ever comes to needing a neutral compromise, I propose “Mainland nēnē”.

    P.S. Lynn, what part of the U.S. do you live in? Here on the west coast I never heard anything but “Canada goose”.

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Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Anseriformes > Anatidae > Branta > Branta canadensis  

Branta canadensis (Canada Goose)

Contents
  • Attributes
  • Audio
  • Citations
  • Consumers
  • Diet Overlap
  • Ecoregions
  • Ecosystems
  • EDGE Analysis
  • Hotspots
  • IBAs
  • Infraspecies
  • Institutions
  • Invasive Species
  • Predators
  • Prey / Diet
  • Protected Areas
  • Providers
  • Range Map
  • Wikipedia Abstract
Synonyms: Anas canadensis Language: French ; Spanish

Wikipedia Abstract

The Canada goose (Branta canadensis) is a large wild goose species with a black head and neck, white patches on the face, and a brown body. Native to arctic and temperate regions of North America, its migration occasionally reaches northern Europe. It has been introduced to Britain, New Zealand, Argentina, Chile, and the Falkland Islands.View Wikipedia Record: Branta canadensis

Infraspecies

Branta canadensis canadensis (Atlantic Canada goose) (Attributes)
Branta canadensis fulva (Vancouver Canada goose)
Branta canadensis interior (Central Canada goose) (Attributes)
Branta canadensis maxima (Giant Canada goose)
Branta canadensis moffitti (Great Basin Canada goose) (Attributes)
Branta canadensis occidentalis (Dusky Canada goose) (Attributes)
Branta canadensis parvipes (Lesser Canada goose) (Attributes)

Invasive Species

Branta canadensis , Canada geese are very adaptable. They can live in a broad range of habitats, which includes cohabitation with humans. In addition, Canada geese are highly fecund and lacking in amount of predators. Population growth of this species over the past years has caused problems in many different areas including environmental, aesthetic, and human health. Canada geese can either be migratory or resident, which enables them to occupy a large geographical range. This species has created issues not only in areas where it has been introduced, but also in its native locations due to the population explosion of the species. Although this species has created problems, it also has been of economic use as well as being, at times, an enjoyable aspect of wildlife.View ISSG Record: Branta canadensis

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale : Similiar (0) 3 Unique (100) Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale : Similiar & Secure (0) 16 Unique & Vulnerable (100) ED Score: 3.44739 EDGE Score: 1.49232Learn more at EDGE of Existence programme

Attributes

Adult Weight  [2]    7.05 lbs (3.20 kg) Birth Weight  [2]    86 grams Female Maturity  [2]    2 years Male Maturity  [2]    2 years Clutch Size  [3]    5 Clutches / Year  [2]    1 Diet  [1]    Herbivore Incubation  [2]    26 days Maximum Longevity  [2]    42 years Speed   [4]    37.36 MPH (16.7 m/s) Water Biome  [1]    Lakes and Ponds, Rivers and Streams, Coastal Wing Span  [4]    5.5 feet (1.69 m)

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Climate Land
Use Alaska Peninsula montane taiga United States Nearctic Boreal Forests/Taiga Alaska-St. Elias Range tundra United States Nearctic Tundra Alberta Mountain forests Canada Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Alberta-British Columbia foothills forests Canada Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Aleutian Islands tundra United States Nearctic Tundra Allegheny Highlands forests United States Nearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests Appalachian mixed mesophytic forests United States Nearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests Appalachian-Blue Ridge forests United States Nearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests Arctic coastal tundra Canada, United States Nearctic Tundra     Arctic foothills tundra Canada, United States Nearctic Tundra Arizona Mountains forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Atlantic coastal pine barrens United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests   Atlantic mixed forests France, Belgium, Netherlands, Germany, Denmark Palearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests Baja California desert Mexico Nearctic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands Baltic mixed forests Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Poland Palearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests Beringia lowland tundra United States Nearctic Tundra Beringia upland tundra United States Nearctic Tundra Bermuda subtropical conifer forests United Kingdom Nearctic Tropical and Subtropical Coniferous Forests   Blue Mountains forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests British Columbia mainland coastal forests Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Brooks-British Range tundra Canada, United States Nearctic Tundra Caledon conifer forests United Kingdom Palearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests California Central Valley grasslands United States Nearctic Temperate Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands California coastal sage and chaparral Mexico, United States Nearctic Mediterranean Forests, Woodlands, and Scrub California interior chaparral and woodlands United States Nearctic Mediterranean Forests, Woodlands, and Scrub California montane chaparral and woodlands United States Nearctic Mediterranean Forests, Woodlands, and Scrub Canadian Aspen forests and parklands Canada Nearctic Temperate Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands Cascade Mountains leeward forests Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Celtic broadleaf forests Ireland, United Kingdom Palearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests   Central and Southern Cascades forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Central and Southern mixed grasslands United States Nearctic Temperate Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands Central British Columbia Mountain forests Canada Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Central China loess plateau mixed forests China Palearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests Central European mixed forests Austria, Belarus, Czech Republic, Germany, Lithuania, Moldovia, Poland, Romania, Russia, Ukraine Palearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests Central forest-grasslands transition United States Nearctic Temperate Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands Central Pacific coastal forests Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests   Central tall grasslands United States Nearctic Temperate Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands Central U.S. hardwood forests United States Nearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests Chihuahuan desert Mexico, United States Nearctic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands Colorado Plateau shrublands United States Nearctic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands Colorado Rockies forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Cook Inlet taiga United States Nearctic Boreal Forests/Taiga Copper Plateau taiga United States Nearctic Boreal Forests/Taiga East Central Texas forests United States Nearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests Eastern Canadian forests Canada Nearctic Boreal Forests/Taiga Eastern Canadian Shield taiga Canada Nearctic Boreal Forests/Taiga Eastern Cascades forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Eastern forest-boreal transition Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests Eastern Great Lakes lowland forests Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests Edwards Plateau savanna United States Nearctic Temperate Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands English Lowlands beech forests United Kingdom Palearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests     Everglades United States Neotropic Flooded Grasslands and Savannas Flint Hills tall grasslands United States Nearctic Temperate Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands Florida sand pine scrub United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Fraser Plateau and Basin complex Canada Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Great Basin montane forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Great Basin shrub steppe United States Nearctic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands Gulf of St. Lawrence lowland forests Canada Nearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests High Arctic tundra Canada Nearctic Tundra Interior Alaska-Yukon lowland taiga Canada, United States Nearctic Boreal Forests/Taiga Interior Yukon-Alaska alpine tundra Canada, United States Nearctic Tundra Klamath-Siskiyou forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Low Arctic tundra Canada Nearctic Tundra Meseta Central matorral Mexico Nearctic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands Mid-Continental Canadian forests Canada Nearctic Boreal Forests/Taiga Middle Arctic tundra Canada Nearctic Tundra Middle Atlantic coastal forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Midwestern Canadian Shield forests Canada Nearctic Boreal Forests/Taiga Mississippi lowland forests United States Nearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests Mojave desert United States Nearctic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands Mongolian-Manchurian grassland China, Mongolia Palearctic Temperate Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands Montana Valley and Foothill grasslands Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands Muskwa-Slave Lake forests Canada Nearctic Boreal Forests/Taiga Nebraska Sand Hills mixed grasslands United States Nearctic Temperate Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands New England-Acadian forests Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests Newfoundland Highland forests Canada Nearctic Boreal Forests/Taiga North Central Rockies forests Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Northeast China Plain deciduous forests China Palearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests Northeastern coastal forests United States Nearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests Northern Anatolian conifer and deciduous forests Turkey Palearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Northern California coastal forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Northern Canadian Shield taiga Canada Nearctic Boreal Forests/Taiga Northern Cordillera forests Canada Nearctic Boreal Forests/Taiga Northern mixed grasslands Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands Northern Pacific coastal forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests   Northern short grasslands Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands Northern tall grasslands Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands Northern transitional alpine forests Canada Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Northwest Territories taiga Canada Nearctic Boreal Forests/Taiga Ogilvie-MacKenzie alpine tundra Canada, United States Nearctic Tundra Okanagan dry forests Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Ozark Mountain forests United States Nearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests Pacific Coastal Mountain icefields and tundra Canada, United States Nearctic Tundra Palouse grasslands United States Nearctic Temperate Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands Piney Woods forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Puget lowland forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Queen Charlotte Islands Canada Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Sarmatic mixed forests Belarus, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Russia, Sweden Palearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests Scandinavian and Russian taiga Norway, Sweden, Finland, Russia Palearctic Boreal Forests/Taiga Scandinavian Montane Birch forest and grasslands Norway, Sweden, Finland Palearctic Tundra Sierra Madre de Oaxaca pine-oak forests Mexico Neotropic Tropical and Subtropical Coniferous Forests Sierra Nevada forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Snake-Columbia shrub steppe United States Nearctic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands Sonoran desert Mexico, United States Nearctic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands South Avalon-Burin oceanic barrens Canada Nearctic Boreal Forests/Taiga South Central Rockies forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests South Florida rocklands United States Neotropic Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests Southeastern conifer forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Southeastern mixed forests United States Nearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests Southern Great Lakes forests Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests Southern Hudson Bay taiga Canada Nearctic Boreal Forests/Taiga Tamaulipan matorral Mexico Nearctic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands Tamaulipan mezquital Mexico, United States Nearctic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands Texas blackland prairies United States Nearctic Temperate Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands Torngat Mountain tundra Canada Nearctic Tundra Upper Midwest forest-savanna transition United States Nearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests Wasatch and Uinta montane forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests Western European broadleaf forests Austria, Czech Republic, France, Germany Palearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests Western Great Lakes forests Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests