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Found 412 results for "visualization": 201 print by Maurits Cornelis Escher (1898-1972), Netherlands
Maurits Cornelis Escher, master artist and creator of tessellations, was born in Leeuwarden, Netherlands in 1898. After an aborted attempt to become an architect, Escher studied graphic art at the School for Architecture and Decorative Arts in Haarlem. Over the years and throughout his travels, he created a number of fascinating landscapes, portraits, and geometric designs, but the work for which he is most famous, his tessellations, were his main preoccupation.

Since his first visit to the Alhambra in Spain in 1922, Escher was intrigued by the Moorish mosaics. Escher animated his own versions of the abstract geometrical designs he had seen. Through his extraordinary creativity and an inate understanding of the mathematics involved, Escher created hundreds, perhaps even thousands, of tessellating shapes in the form of fish, birds, dogs, crabs, insects, horses, humans, and other beasts.

In the Escher section of Totally Tessellated, you will find a variety of information about M. C. Escher, but by no means all that is available. When there is a particular reference that will supplement your studies of Escher and tessellations, the reference will be noted. Here you will find a brief bibliography, and introduction to Escher's collective works, and a section on his tessellations, including an analysis of a selection of Escher's best, and instructions on how to create some of your own.

All M. C. Escher works (c) Cordon Art B.V.-Baarn-the Netherlands.

Gallery of Data Visualization: Visual delights -> Totally Tessellated
470 1998 computer graphics by Emmanuel Frécon
WebPath is "... a tool that unobtrusively visualises a user's trail as they browse the Web", developed by Emmanuel Frécon, a researcher in the Distributed Collaborative Environments group at SICS, and Gareth Smith in the Computing Department, at Lancaster University.




See Frécon and Smith's 1998 paper for more information. "WebPath - A three-dimensional Web History", IEEE Symposium on Information Visualization (InfoVis '98), Chapel Hill. NC, USA.

Atlas of Cyberspaces: Surf Maps Visualising Web Browsing
42

1820 Verhaeltness Karte

1785 print by August Friedrich Wilhelm Crome, Germany
Superimposed squares to compare areas (of European states).

Crome, A. F. W. (1785). Über die Grösse and Bevölkerung der Sämtlichen Europäschen Staaten . Leipzig: Weygand.

Nikolow, S. (2001). A.f.w. crome's measurements of the strength of the state: Statistical representations in central europe around 1800. In J.L. Klein and M.S. Morgan (eds.), The Age of Economic Measurement . Raleigh, NC: Duke University Press.

Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization:
540

1996 Presidential returns

computer graphics
The results of the popular vote in the 1996 U.S. presidential race are visualized above using traditional thematic mapping. Each state is colored either a shade of red or a shade of blue, denoting the majority winner of each state as Clinton or Dole, respectively, with color saturation indicating the magnitude of the winning percentage. There is a significant problem with this visualization. Without prior knowledge of population density across the country, the viewer has no clear indicator as to who actually won the election. While this map provides a medium of familiarity, it produces an intrinsic distortion of the very data we are trying to analyze. Since elections are not won on square miles, the results would be better visualized on a map more representative of population. These same election results are shown below on a 1996 equal population cartogram generated using the Constraint-Based Method.

Cartogram Gallery
907

25 Years of Ars Electronica

2004 computer graphics by Gerhard Dirmoser
In the last years, Gerhard Dirmoser has developed a set of strikingly complex visualization posters under the theme "Art-in-Context" (Die Kunst der Ausstellung). The form of this context is usually a diagram in the size of a poster (aprox. 240cm x 180cm), split in 4 parts.

In this poster, Dirmoser analyzes most author's contributions to Ars Electronica in the last 25 years. Due to the limitations of the available surface, it wasn't possible to provide a complete detailed presentation of all the participating artists, scientists and developers (about 3100 persons are listed). All the participants were compared with the AEC/Ars database.

The language material used was taken from publications on "ars electronica", notes (on the symposium lectures) and relevant literature. The study "Designing Gestures" on ars electronica 2003 was carried out in parallel. The choice/placement is thus to be regarded as the author of the study's subjective/content-based selection.The study is intended to provide a wide-ranging survey, but it cannot substitute for reading the catalogues. In some cases, key works (or concepts) are cited, which were not shown in Linz, but are described in detail in catalogues. The poster can also be used as an index with the page numbers.

The first image shows one of the four pieces of the poster and the second image is a detailed view of it. To see the poster in a public installation, click here

visualcomplexity
134

3D contour map

1999 computer graphics by Leland Wilkinson (1944-), USA
Grammar of Graphics: A comprehensive systematization of grammatical rules for data and graphs and graph algebras within an object-oriented, computational framework.

Wilkinson, L. (1999). The Grammar of Graphics. New York: Springer. ISBN 0-387-98774-6.

Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization:
306

3D Geographic Network Display

1996 computer graphics by Stephen G. Eick and colleagues, Bell Laboratories
Two examples of the research work of Stephen G. Eick and colleagues at Bell Laboratories into the visualization and analysis of Internet traffic flows. Their 1996 research paper "3D Geographic Network Display" provides further details.

Atlas of Cyberspaces: Mapping Cyberspace Using Geographic Metaphors
145

A 4-Way Association (nested dimensions)

1989 computer graphics by Ted Mihalisin, USA
Use of 'nested dimensions' (related to trellis and mosaic displays) for the visualization of multidimensional data. Continuous variables are binned, and variables are allocated to the horizontal and vertical dimensions in a nested fashion.

Mihalisin, T., Gawlinski, E., Timlin, J., and Schwegler, J. (Oct. 1989). Multi-dimensional graphing in two dimensional spaces. Scientific Computing and Automation, 6:15-20.

Mihalisin, T., Schwegler, J., and Timlin, J. (1992). Hierarchical multivariate visualization. In H. J. Newton (ed.), Computing Science and Statistics: Proceedings of the 24th Symposium on the Interface, vol. 24, pp.141-149.

Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization:
194

A Knot Zoo

1998 computer graphics (KnotPlot) by Robert G. Scharein
From the knotplot.com/zoo website, you can click on a knot to load it into an interactive 3D viewer (requires Java).

Gallery of Data Visualization: Visual delights -> The KnotPlot Site
195

A Knot Zoo (zoom)

1998 computer graphics (KnotPlot) by Robert G. Scharein
From the knotplot.com/zoo website, you can click on a knot to load it into an interactive 3D viewer (requires Java).

Gallery of Data Visualization: Visual delights -> The KnotPlot Site
43

A Specimen of a Chart of Biography

1765 print by Joseph Priestley (1733-1804), England
Historical time line (life spans of 2,000 famous people, 1200 B.C. to 1750 A.D.), quantitative comparison by means of bars.

Priestley, J. (1765). A Chart of Biography . London: (n.p.). BL: 611.I.19.

Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization:
229

A visual proof of the Pythagorean theorem

Wolfgang Slany
Proofs are usually dry, dusty stuff sprinkled liberally with symbols. What about proving something with a picture? This proof of the Pythagorean Theorem is attributed to Bhaskara, a Hindu mathematician of the 12th century. We are given the bottom right triangle. Construct a square by making three copies of the triangle, as shown.

Got it? The side of the small square is b-a, and its area is (b-a)² or b²-2ab+a². The area of our triangle is ab/2. The area of all four triangles is 2ab. Then the area of all four triangles, plus the area of the small square is b²+a². So c²=a²+b².

See also the AMS page: http://www.math.sunysb.edu/~tony/whatsnew/column/visual-0300/visual1.html

Gallery of Data Visualization: Visual Explanation
921

Adapting the Cognitive Walkthrough Method

2005 computer graphics by Kenneth Allendoerfer, Serge Aluk
The usability of knowledge domain visualization (KDViz) tools can be assessed at several levels. Cognitive Walkthrough (CW) is a well-known usability inspection method that focuses on how easily users can learn software through exploration. Typical applications of CW follow structured tasks where user goals and action sequences that lead to achievement of the goals are welldefined. KDViz and other information visualization tools, however, are typically designed for users to explore data and user goals and actions are less well understood.

In this paper, presented at the 2005 IEEE Symposium on Information Visualization,the authors describe how the traditional CW method may be adapted for assessing the usability of these systems. They apply the adapted version of CW to CiteSpace, a KDViz tool that uses bibliometric analyses to create visualizations of scientific literatures. They describe usability issues identified by the adapted CW and discuss how CiteSpace supported the completion of tasks, such as

visualcomplexity
635

amazon.com map (snapshot)

2006 computer graphics (interactive) by thepurehands.org
a visualization of the entire book collection from Amazon. the size of categories reflects the approximate number of books within that category. users can zoom in to explore the books that are filed under the category, until indivisual individual books are visible. currently still a prototype.

see also amazon treemap & amaztype & music plasma.

From "thepurehands.org" website:

"Walking into the university for me keeps me bumping into people which generate interesting flows of information. The key observation was that of a library. The conversation turned to open and closed stack libraries. Closed stack libraries ( like the British Library) you walk in and order the book you want and that’s what you get. Open stack libraries you get the books your self and you get to see the books near the ones your looking for. This can lead to wonderful accidents.



The software for UCL’s library is closed stack - it tells you about what you asked for and nothing else. We noted that on Amazon acts like a closed stack ( you ask for books it finds them ) and tries to act like a (open shelf) library or a book shop. It does this by presenting similar books to the one you take notice of. We called this ‘slit shelf’ ( between open and closed ). At first we like the notion of producing an interface to all of the UCL library. Trying to get the data would be FAR too difficult for a short project. A little research showed that Amazon had and a way to let developers access all the data (if a little slowly).So the project became to visualise all of Amazon (books).



This was good as Amazon is distinctly pre-Google. The primary web-page is stuffed with information noise. Each page is also overwhelms the reader with considerable excess and irrelevant information. From a design point of view it would be good to bring some clarity to the browsing process. What would you do?"

information aesthetics
115

American Divisions in France, WWI

1919 print by Leonard Porter Ayres (1879-1946), USA
Social statistical chartbook, containing a variety of graphic and semi-graphic displays in a USA Government report. [This image is a fine early example of a semi-graphic display, showing four variables simultaneously.]

Ayres, L. P. (1919). The War with Germany, A Statistical Summary . Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office. ISBN 040511852X. Commonly known as the Ayres report; reprinted: Arno Press, NY, 1979.

*Tufte, E. R. (1983). The Visual Display of Quantitative Information . Cheshire, CT: Graphics Press.

Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization:
959

AmoebaAbstracts 1-3

2002 computer graphics by Marius Watz
Marius Watz, Art Director of Generator.x, has used the nom-de-guerre Amoeba since 1995 for experimentation in electronic media, with the web site Evolutionzone.com as the output. In this environment, Watz shows amazing generative art pieces that are both intriguing and captivating.

AmoebaAbstracts 1-3, is a set of 3 experiments in abstract computational composition and dynamic form. The abstracts, responsive to user input, were built with Processing for the exhibition "Abstraction Now", Kunstlerhaus Wien, September 2003, and were also exhibited at Sonar 2004, Barcelona. The images shown are representative of Abstract 2, an endlessly emerging geometric pattern.

This generative piece of visual abstraction doesn't consider any set of actual data, however, its aesthetical visual depiction represents a fresh approach that might prove inspiring to any network visualization endeavor.

visualcomplexity
74

Anamorphic map of France

1888 print by Émile Cheysson (1836-1910), France
First anamorphic maps, using a deformation of spatial size to show a quantitative variable (e.g., the decrease in time to travel from Paris to various places in France over 200 years).

Palsky, G. (1996). Des Chiffres et des Cartes: Naissance et développement de la cartographie quantitative française au XIXe siècle. Paris: Comité des Travaux Historiques et Scientifiques (CTHS). ISBN 2-7355-0336-3.

(Fig. 63-64)

Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization:
986

Animated Exploration of Graphs with Radial Layout

2001 computer graphics by Ka-Ping Yee, Danyel Fisher, Rach
Presented at InfoVis 2001, this project presents a new animation technique for supporting interactive exploration of a graph using a radial tree layout method. As an alternative to trying to fit an entire graph into one view, this project provides exploration of subregions of the graph. Even if a graph is small enough to display all at once, it can be difficult to understand all of its relationships from only a single view. The ability to interactively view a graph from different perspectives can yield new insights.

The authors used a visualization paradigm in which the view of a graph is determined by the selection of a single node as the center of interest, or focus. The main contribution of this work is a new technique for animating the transitions from one view to the next in a smooth, appealing manner. The algorithm augments the well-known radial layout method by linearly interpolating the polar coordinates of the nodes and enforcing constraints on the new layout to keep it as similar as possible to the previous layout. When combined with a method for aggregating or eliding nodes far away from the focus, this technique can also provide an effective way to explore very large graphs.

visualcomplexity
189

Antoine's Necklace

1998 computer graphics (KnotPlot) by Robert G. Scharein
Third stage in the construction of Antoine's necklace. The next stage would be to replace each component ring in the above with a linked chain of rings. At the end of an infinite number of such steps we are left with Antoine's necklace, an object homeomorphic to the Cantor space.

Gallery of Data Visualization: Visual delights -> The KnotPlot Site
781

AS paths to individual networks

1997 computer graphics by (unknown)
A potential for a visualization (similar to http://moat.nlanr.net/AS/background.html) maps Autonomous Systems as nodes on the surface of a sphere, and then interconnect via reachability paths. The following visualization attempts to to this, by then also mapping the nine BGP peers (which exchange data with the server in Oregon) onto a site of the sphere opposite the target AS number (90).

The graphic shows the (green) Oregon server on the left site, connected to the (purple) BGP sites, from where then the paths emerge via (yellow) pipes and (red) Autonomous System spheres at the inside of the (blue, transparent) system sphere, towards the (green) target network.

visualcomplexity
190

Ashley Knots

2003 computer graphics (KnotPlot) by Robert G. Scharein
Clifford Ashley (1881-1947), an American painter and writer, is probably better known as an expert knot tyer and the author of the magnificent The Ashley Book of Knots. You could do no better than to go to that source for thousands of intricate drawings of knots and the process of tying them. Since I can't tie a bowline without consulting a manual, I admire Ashley mainly as a drawer of knots. Ashley includes many knots that are primarily decorative. Some of these are closed loops (as are mathematical knots).

I call the knots on this page "Ashley knots," but of course many of them were invented long before Ashley. Please consult Ashley's book to see the origin of each of these knots.



Gallery of Data Visualization: Visual delights -> The KnotPlot Site
163

Auto Data (corrgram)

2002 by Friendly, M.
Correlation (and covariance) matrices provide the basis for all (classical) multivariate statistical techniques, but most of these compress the correlations into a low-dimensional summary. How about a direct graphical display?

The correlogram uses two general techniques:

(a) rendering the value of a correlation to depict its sign and magnitude. This image shows just two: circular ``pac-man'' pies, and shading, with diagonal stripes indicating the direction. In both, Blue is used for positive correlations, and red for negative, with the intensity of shading proportional to the magnitude of the correlation.

(b) re-ordering the variables in a correlation matrix so that ``similar'' variables are positioned adjacently. Here, the variables have been permuted based on the angular ordering of the first two principal components.

The figure shows the correlations among 12 measures of 74 automobiles from the 1979 year, from Friendly, M., "Corrgrams: Exploratory displays for correlation matrices" (2002). The American Statistician v.1.5.

Gallery of Data Visualization: Bright ideas
132

Bachi number patterns

1968 print by Roberto Bachi (1909-1995), Israel
Systematic "graphical rational patterns" for statistical presentation.

Bachi, R. (1968). Graphical Rational Patterns, A New Approach to Graphical Presentation of Statistics. Jerusalem: Israel Universities Press.

Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization:
1018

Backchannel

2006 computer graphics by (unknown)
Backchannel is a real-time view of the conversation happening in the #etech IRC channel at O'Reilly's Emerging Technology Conference. Stamen Design has a bot observing events in the channel, publishing them as a web-service via XML and JSON, and making them available to a visualization component built in Flash.

A conference backchannel is home to a lot of interesting conversational dynamics: additional context, participation from speakers, visitors from elsewhere in the world, sniping, and coordinated walkouts. The authors were intrigued by the idea of a pointedly live visual environment that would illustrate and respond to this other space.

Each participant in the backchannel is shown in a circle, with nicknames arranged alphabetically, counter-clockwise from right. Blue bars next to each nickname show how active each participant has been. Connections between nicknames show participants who?ve spoken around the same time. Events are marked in a narrow strip across the top, in blue. The most recent events are at right, stretching back in time about three hours to the left.

visualcomplexity
909

Bagle Worm 3D Visualization

2005 computer graphics by Ero Carrera, Gergely Erdelyi
Windows binary malware has come a long way. Today's average worm is often tens or hundreds of kilobytes of code exhibiting a level of complexity that surpasses even some operating systems. This degree of complexity, coupled with the overwhelming flow of new malware, calls for improvements to tools and techniques used in analysis.

F-Secure produced this rich 3D animation that visualizes the structure and execution of the W32/Bagle.AG@mm worm. The boxes in the picture are functions of the worm. The one on the top is the 'main' where the execution starts. The first ring contains all the functions that 'main' calls. The second all the functions that the ones on the first ones call and so on. All connecting lines represent the calls from one function to the other. Red boxes belong to the virus code while the blue ones are API calls library code that do not belong to the malicious code. The animation was created using IDA Pro, IDAPython, Blender and other custom scripts.

For a direct link to the animation (quicktime required), click here.

visualcomplexity
1230

Base Realignment and Closure visualization

2006 computer graphics by Robert Pietrusko and Nadia Ries-Shen (PIIM)
The 2005 BRAC recommendation describes in great detail the flow of troops, civilian jobs and military equipment that will occur over the next ten years in response to a massive base realignment and closure scheme. This information, however, is spread over many hundreds of pages that obscure the interdependencies between states as well as economic and environmental ramifications.

PIIM's visualization provides a more intuitive and faster access to BRAC dynamics that would allow decision makers to delve into the details that specifically show how decisions made at bases impact the dynamics of the people and economy in even distant states.

After familiarization with an accompanying legend, a user can quickly gain an overall understanding of how each state, and each base, is impacted by the BRAC initiative. Over thousands of data points can thus be reviewed rapidly and in the context of bases, recommendations and the nation.

Parsons Institute for Information Mapping (PIIM)
1211

Base Realignment and Closure visualization (legend)

2006 computer graphics by Robert Pietrusko and Nadia Ries-Shen (PIIM)
After familiarization with this legend, one can quickly gain an overall understanding of how each state, and each base, is impacted by the BRAC initiative in the main visualization. Thousands of data points can thus be reviewed rapidly and in the context of bases, recommendations and the nation.

Parsons Institute for Information Mapping (PIIM)
1210

Base Realignment and Closure visualization (single recommendation)

2006 computer graphics by Robert Pietrusko and Nadia Ries-Shen (PIIM)
Fort Monmouth Recommendation

This visual snapshot maps the effect of the Army recommendation to close Fort Monmouth Army base and redistribute personnel to other bases within the BRAC initiative. An interactive tool based on all BRAC data will permit six view options. These include (1) the effect of a single recommendation on a single base, (2) the effect of a single recommendation on all affected bases, (3) the effects of all recommendations on a single base, (4) the effects of all recommendations on all bases, (5) the effects of a single base on all affected bases regardless of recommendation, and lastly (6) the effects on a single base by immediately impacting bases regardless of recommendation. (The depicted view currently shows an example of option two: the effect of a single recommendation on all affected bases).

Parsons Institute for Information Mapping (PIIM)
865

base26

2004 computer graphics by Karsten Schmidt
Four-letter words have a special status in the english language and culture. Counting in at over 1650 words, in most cases the term is only used to address the more crude, sexual subset and its use has been effectively eliminated from the language of "good" society, mainly due to its negative connotations with lack of education, etiquette and status. In a way, the use of those four-letter words reflects the schizoid prudence and class system in English speaking societies, still evident today.

base26 is a startling interactive visualization project that attempts to give a spatial overview of the entirety of this part of English language heritage, as well as to explore and visualize relations between all those words. Letters are interpeted as 4D coordinates, shown in a smoothly transforming 3D space, produced with Processing.

visualcomplexity
77

Bertillon map

1896 print by Jacques Bertillon (1851-1922), France
Use of area rectangles on a map to display two variables and their product (population of arrondisements in Paris, percent foreigners; area = absolute number of foreigners).

Bertillon, J. (1896). Fréquence des étrangers à Paris en 1891. In Cours élementaire de statistique administrative. Paris: Societé d'éditions scientifiques. (map).

Palsky, G. (1996). Des Chiffres et des Cartes: Naissance et développement de la cartographie quantitative française au XIXe siècle . Paris: Comité des Travaux Historiques et Scientifiques (CTHS). ISBN 2-7355-0336-3.

(Fig. 85)

Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization:
72

Binomial distribution, 999 trials

1846 print by Adolphe Quetelet (1796-1874), Belgium
Results of sampling from urns shown as symmetrical histograms, with limiting "curve of possibility" (later called the normal curve).

Quetelet, A. (1846). Lettres sur la Théorie des Probabilités, Appliquée aux Sciences Morales et Politiques. Brussels: M. Hayez.

Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization:
122

Biplot representation of blood chemistry data

1971 print by Rubin Gabriel (1929-2003), USA
Development of the biplot, a method for visualizing both the observations and variables in a multivariate data set in a single display. Observations are typically represented by points, variables by vectors, such that the position of a point along a vector represents the data value.

Gabriel, K. R. (1971). The biplot graphic display of matrices with application to principal components analysis. Biometrics, 58(3):453-467.

Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization:
121

Biplot representation of ratings of automobiles

1971 print by Rubin Gabriel (1929-2003), USA
Development of the biplot, a method for visualizing both the observations and variables in a multivariate data set in a single display. Observations are typically represented by points, variables by vectors, such that the position of a point along a vector represents the data value.

Gabriel, K. R. (1971). The biplot graphic display of matrices with application to principal components analysis. Biometrics, 58(3):453-467.

Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization:
106

Births and Deaths in Germany in a Year (pictogram)

1924 print by Otto Neurath (Director of the Social and Economic Museum) (1882-1945), Vienna, Austria
Museum of Social Statistical Graphics and the ISOTYPE system (International System of Typographic Picture Education).

Neurath, O. (1973). From Vienna method to Isotype. In M. Neurath and R. S. Cohen (eds.), Empiricism and Sociology, pp. 214-248. Dordrecht, NL: Reidel. (papers written 1925-45).

Neurath, O. (1991). Gesammelte Bildpaedagogische Schriften. Vienna: Verlag Hoelder-Pichler-Tempsky. ISBN 3209008639. Rudolf Haller and Robin Kinross (eds.).

Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization:
1255

BlogBabel

2007 Web by Daniele Galiffa using Actionscript
Analysis and experiments on relations into the Italian Blogosphere





I’ve been invited to join to the blogbabel initiative that aims to map the italian blogosphere. My effort in this interesting project is about to find some new, useful infovis-related solutions to offer some better cognitive tools to approach the Italian blog world and its relations. I started looking around to find interesting solutions about blog-mapping ( from the Manuel Lima’s blogviz, to the BlogoPole French initiative and the first BlogBabel visualization from Ludo).





What seemed to me really interesting is mainly the relations Analysis and not the Graph representation, because it tends to offer a “star-system” style visual environment that requires some more deep work in order to be used to understand how blogs are related each other.





My idea is really simple: suppose you have a line where you can use points to represent Blogs. Above the line I can have arches connecting a source blog (on the left side of the arch) to another (on the right side of the arch). Below the line I can have also arches, but the connection direction is from right to left.





The use of arches and circles come out from “The Shape of Songs” by Martin Wattenberg. In this way we have a LinksOut View (UP) and a LinksIn View (DOWN) and we could use the opacity of each arch to visualize how relations are relevant considering the numeber of links (in/out) among blogs.





The above description was modified from:


http://www.mentegrafica.it/blog/2007/05/10/analisys-and-experiments-on-relation-into-the-italian-blogosphere/




(images may be found at http://flickr.com/photos/danielegaliffa/tags/blogosphere/)

Mentegrafica
749

Botanical Visualization of Huge Hierarchies

2001 computer graphics by Ernst Kleiberg, Huub van de Wete
This method is based on the observation that we can easily see the branches, leaves and their arrangement in a botanical tree, despite of the large number of elements. The strand model of Holton is used to convert an abstract tree into a geometric model. Non-leaf nodes are mapped to branches and child nodes to sub-branches. Furthermore, continuing branches are emphasized, long branches are contracted, and sets of leaves are shown as fruit. The method is applied to the visualization of directory structures. The elements, directories and files, as well as their relations can easily be extracted, thereby showing that methods from botanical modeling can be effective for information visualization.

visualcomplexity
123

Boxplot of leading digits of lottery numbers

1969 print by John W. Tukey (1915-2000), USA
Graphical innovations for exploratory data analysis (stem-and-leaf, graphical lists, box-and-whisker plots, two-way and extended-fit plots, hanging and suspended rootograms).

Tukey, J. W. (1972). Some graphic and semigraphic displays. In T. A. Bancroft (ed.), Statistical Papers in Honor of George W. Snedecor, pp. 293-316. Ames, IA: Iowa State University Press. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Statistical Association, August 1969.

Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization:
993

Brain Mapping

2004 computer graphics by Patrick Yau
As an undergraduate at UC Davis, Patrick Yau had the opportunity to work at the Visualization and Graphics Research Group in the Institute for Data Analysis and Visualization (IDAV). He was under the guidance of Professor Bernd Hamann and Dr. Lars Linsen when he and his colleagues developed the project "Brain Mapping via Hierarchical Isosurface Segmentation Based on Discrete Curvature".

The idea of the project is to look into the surface of two brains and identify the similarities between then. They focused in particular on the curvature of the brains (folds and bumps). Yau worked on data preprocessing and the automated brain mapping algorithm. He wrote a procedure that automatically identifies the front, side and the top for two brains using Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and he also wrote a procedure that constructs a topology graph based on the curvature of a brain. The two images shown here reveal different representations of the same brain: as points and as a topology graph.

visualcomplexity
197

Broadway Boogie Woogie

1942 oil on canvas by Piet Mondrian
This is not an actual tessellation since it does not repeat. However, the heavy usage of squares and rectangles is a technique that can create tessellations easily. The coloring technique is also interesting. Mondrian balances the three colors used in this design (the primary colors plus gray) to give balance to the artwork. (Posted by Nicolas Pioch.)

The Museum of Modern Art, New York

Gallery of Data Visualization: Visual delights -> Totally Tessellated
141

Brushing scatterplots (interactive labeling of brushed points)

1987 computer graphics by Richard A. Becker and William S. Cleveland, USA
Figure 14 from "Brushing scatterplots" showing interactive labeling of brushed points. An example of interactive statistical graphics allowing brushing, linking, and other forms of interaction.

Becker, R. A. and Cleveland, W. S. (1987). Brushing scatterplots. Technometrics, 29:127-142.

Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization:
873

BuddyZoo - AOL Instant Messenger analysis

2005 computer graphics by Adam D'Angelo
BuddyZoo is a visualization analysis tool that maps AIM buddy lists in order to detect a series of patterns. Here's how it works: Users submit their AIM buddy lists to buddyzoo.com, and then the application runs all kinds of analysis on the data, letting users:

- Find out which buddies they have in common with their friends.
- Measure how popular they are.
- Detect cliques they're part of.
- See a visualization of their Buddy List.
- View their Prestige, computed in a similar manner as Google's PageRank.
- See the degrees of separation between different screen-names.

visualcomplexity
1021

Cabspotting

2006 computer graphics by Shawn Allen, Thomas Apodaca, Mik
Invisible Dynamics is a research project sponsored by The Exploratorium which explores the meanings and representations of place. Working across the domains of art, design, cultural geography, cartography, information design, sociology, hydrology, marine sciences, and history, I.D. hosts residencies and workshops, as well as developing exhibitions and public programs. Using new technologies for the representation and analysis of spatial information, I.D. investigates the complexities of the San Francisco Bay Region in the context of the Pacific Rim.

As part of Invisible Dynamics, Stamen Design has been exploring visualizations of GPS data generated by Yellow Cab taxi cabs in San Francisco. In these frame-by-frame maps of the locations of cabs in the Bay Area, the city ebbs and pulses like the beating of a heart in a truly captivating sequence. Both visualizations are part of a video where each frame shows 15 minutes of activity in a dynamic map of taxicabs' speed and position. In the first image, speed is represented by the change in color (White: 0 mph Red: >35 mph), while in the second, larger crosses represent faster taxis.

Cabspotting is a product of San Francisco's Stamen Design, a boutique services firm specializing in data visualization, map making, interactive media, and creative technology reinterpretation. You might remember Stamen from such projects as Mappr or In The News / Vox Delicii.

visualcomplexity
1

Carte de l'Europe, de l'Afrique du Nord et du Proche-Orient

1375 print by Abraham Cresques (1325-1387), Majorca, Spain
Catalan Atlas, an exquisitely beautiful visual cosmography, perpetual calendar, and thematic representation of the known world.

Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization
64

Carte des Lignes Isothermes

1817 print by Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), Germany
First graph of isotherms, showing mean temperature around the world by latitude and longitude. Recognizing that temperature depends more on latitude and altitude, a subscripted graph shows the direct relation of temperature on these two variables.

von Humboldt, A. (1817). Sur les lignes isothermes. Annales de Chimie et de Physique, 5:102-112.

Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization:
66

Carte des Lignes Isothermes

1817 print by Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859)
von Humboldt isotherms from Berghaus' 1849 AtlasrnrnFirst graph of isotherms, showing mean temperature around the world by latitude and longitude. Recognizing that temperature depends more on latitude and altitude, a subscripted graph shows the direct relation of temperature on these two variables - Germany

Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization:
557

Cartogram II: world-city space showing cities

computer graphics Information Visualization community platform
48

Cartogram map of France

1819 print by Baron Pierre Charles Dupin (1784-1873), France
Cartogram, map with shadings from black to white (distribution and intensity of illiteracy in France), the first (unclassed) choropleth map, and perhaps the first modern statistical map. (This cartogram dates from 1826 (Dupin 1827, Plate 1, vol.2) according to Robinson (p.232), rather than 1819 according to Funkhouser).

Dupin, C. (1826). Carte figurative de l'instruction populaire de la France . Jobard. BNF: Ge C 6588 (Funkhouser (1937, p.300) incorrectly dates this as 1819).

Dupin, C. (1827). Forces productives et commerciales de la France. Bachelier.

Robinson, A. H. (1982). Early Thematic Mapping in the History of Cartography . Chicago: University of Chicago Press. ISBN 0-226-72285-6.

Funkhouser, H. G. (Nov. 1937). Historical development of the graphical representation of statistical data. Osiris, 3(1):269-405. Reprinted Brugge, Belgium: St. Catherine Press, 1937.



Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization:
40

Chart of National Debt

1786 print by William Playfair (1759-1823), England
Bar chart, line graphs of economic data.

Playfair, W. (1786). Commercial and Political Atlas: Representing, by Copper-Plate Charts, the Progress of the Commerce, Revenues, Expenditure, and Debts of England, during the Whole of the Eighteenth Century . London: Corry. Re-published in Wainer, H. and Spence, I. (eds.), The Commercial and Political Atlas and Statistical Breviary, 2005, Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0-521-85554-3.

Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization:
47

Charts showing temperature throughout the world

1838 print by Heinrich Berghaus (1797-1884), Germany
Physical atlas of the distribution of plants, animals, climate, etc., one of the most extensive and detailed thematic atlases; most of the maps contained tables, graphs, pictorial profiles of distributions over altitude, and other visual accompanyments.

Berghaus, H. (1838). Physikalischer Atlas . Gotha: Justus Perthes. 2 vols., published 1845-48.

Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization:
160

Chi-square Map with circle cartogram

1991 by Jason Dykes and David Unwin
There are many difficulties in showing rates of incidence or proportions in maps, when both the areas of geographic regions, and the populations in those regions vary, often inversely. In spatial epidemiology, for example, Standardized Mortality Ratios are often used, expressing the ratios of the number of deaths in each area to those expected on the basis of some externally specified (typically national) age-sex specific rates.

This figure uses a Chi-square metric to depict the distribution of number of cars, O, in each ward in Leicestershire, UK, expressed as a signed chi-square contribution, (Oi - Ei)/ Ö Ei, relative to the expected number, E, per capita. A diverging colour scheme applies hues of red and blue to those areas with higher and lower than expected values with colour saturation showing the magnitude of the variation. Thus whiter zones are close to the expected value and deeper blues and fuller reds show the extremes. This map still confounds area and population with visual impact, which the use of a cartogram base, with circle areas proportional to the population, helps avoid.

Figures from Maps of the Census: A Rough Guide, by Jason Dykes and David Unwin (http://www.agocg.ac.uk/reports/visual/casestud/dykes/abstra_1.htm).

Abstract:

This Case Study describes the considerations that are needed to produce maps of data from the Census of Population. The `area value' or choropleth map is the standard means of displaying such information on paper. It is a very imperfect visualisation device. First, it is necessary to be careful about the numbers that are mapped and, in particular, never to map absolute numbers. Second, choropleth maps are very sensitive to the mapping zones being used. To produce maps that do not distort the underlying distributions it is necessary to understand how the zones were defined and the effects of their varying sizes on the mapped pattern. Third, there are a series of strictly cartographic considerations related to how these maps are classed and the symbolism used. All of these issues are illustrated using data from the 1991 Population Census for Leicestershire, UK.

These problems lead to a consideration of the need to develop new mapping tools. Dynamic maps can take advantage of an interactive software environment to overcome some of the limitations of the static map. The possibilities which they provide for interactive engagement with data make them appropriate tools for exploratory analysis, or visual thinking. A mapping tool is introduced, which exemplifies this form of map use and examples of the techniques that might be used to visualize the UK Census of Population are provided.

Gallery of Data Visualization: Bright ideas
46

Chladni Vibration Patterns

1787 print by Ernest Florens Friedrich Chladni (1756-1827), Germany
Visualization of vibration patterns (by spreading a uniform layer of sand on a disk, and observing displacement when vibration is applied).

Chladni, E. F. F. (1787). Entdeckungen uber die Theorie des Klanges. Leipzig: Bey Weidmanns Erben und Reich.

Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization:
904

CIA World Factbook Visualization

2004 computer graphics by Moritz Stefaner
As a follow-up job, Moritz Stefaner developed a visual semantic web browser for the project WINDS, an EC-funded project in the 5th Framework, Information Society Technologies programme, Flexible University key action. The main goal of WINDS is to contribute to the reorganisation of the pedagogical, cultural and functional aspects of design education at university.

Stefaner produced this flash demo that allows an incredibly smooth navigation through the content of the CIA Factbook, jumping from country to country with extreme fluidity. For every country one can easily see its neighboring countries, the official languages, water and terrestrial boundaries, and even more detailed info by expanding the country's sphere. The visualized data came from a semi-automatically generated learning object index of the eLearning environment ALE.

visualcomplexity
486

Cichlid: vBNS network

computer graphics (Cichlid) by Jeff Brown
A screenshot of a 3D model of the vBNS network which connects universities and laboratories in the USA. The model was created by Jeff Brown, a researcher at MOAT, National Laboratory for Applied Network Research (NLANR), USA, using his Cichlid data visualisation software. The model is animated to show how traffic flows over the links.




More information on their work can be found in the paper "Network Performance Visualization: Insight Through Animation" by J.A. Brown, McGregor A.J and H-W Braun.

Atlas of Cyberspaces: Topology Maps of Elements of Cyberspace
79

Circle diagram of infant mortality by month in Brussels

1885 print by Émile Levasseur (1828-1911), France
Comprehensive review of all available statistical graphics presented to the Statistical Society of London, classified as figures, maps, and solids (3D), perhaps the first mature attempt at a systematic classification of graphical forms.

Levasseur, É. (1885). La statistique graphique. Journal of the Statistical Society of London, 50?:218-250.

Gallery of Data Visualization: Milestones in the History of Thematic Cartography, Statistical Graphics, and Data Visualization:
169

Classification of townships (reorderable matrix)

1981
Data are often presented in a table or chart whose rows and columns are intrinsically unordered, but which are arranged in an order which conceals patterns, rather than reveal them. The top figure shows a classification of townships (columns) by binary characteristics (rows, presence or absence), both arranged in arbitrary order. Can you see any patterns or trends?

One of Bertin's graphical methods consists simply of permuting the rows and columns to place similar rows and columns together. This gives the bottom figure, where now the trends are clear. See also: Harri Siirtola's The Reorderable Matrix (Java 1.1 Applet, + you need Swing) for an interactive demo. The Jacques Bertin, Semiologie Graphique web site has a nice dynamic display of the reorderable matrix.

[Source: Bertin (1981), Graphics and Graphic Information Processing.]

Gallery of Data Visualization: Bright ideas
638

Clusters

computer graphics (Graphviz) by Graphviz - Graph Visualization Software
This small example illustrates dot's feature to draw nodes and edges in clusters or separate rectangular layout regions. Clusters are encoded as subgraphs whose names have the prefix 'cluster'. The color attribute of a cluster is interpreted as its outline color or its background color if its style is 'filled'. Mdiamond and Msquare are modified symbols for data flow diagrams.

Graphviz - Graph Visualization Software: gallery
571

Color Code: A Color Portrait of the English Language

2005 computer graphics by Martin Wattenberg and Jonathan Feinberg
2005-08-29: "Color Code" - Interactive Map of the English Language

From InfoVis:Wiki

Martin Wattenberg and Jonathan Feinberg created Color Code, an astonishing interactive map of 33,000 English nou htvriiru. canada goose herrejakkens:

A picture of 33,000 English nouns, grouped by meaning. Each word is given the average color of web images found when searching for that term.[Wattenberg and Feinberg, 2005]

A picture of 33,000 English nouns, grouped by meaning. Each word is given the average color of web images found when searching for that term.

[Wattenberg and Feinberg, 2005]

Color Code is a full-color portrait of the English language.

The artwork is an interactive map of more than 33,000 words. Each word has been assigned a color based on the average color of images found by a search engine. The words are then grouped by meaning. The resulting patterns form an atlas of our lexicon.

[Wattenberg and Feinberg, 2005]

via thedesignweblog

[Wattenberg and Feinberg, 2005] Martin Wattenberg and Jonathan Feinberg, Color Code: A Color Portrait of the English Language, Retrieved at: August 29, 2005. http://loop.aiga.org/resources/loop/loop9/colorproject/index.html

Information Visualization community platform
572

Color Code: A Color Portrait of the English Language

2005 computer graphics by Martin Wattenberg and Jonathan Feinberg
2005-08-29: "Color Code" - Interactive Map of the English Language

From InfoVis:Wiki

Martin Wattenberg and Jonathan Feinberg created Color Code, an astonishing interactive map of 33,000 English nouns:

A picture of 33,000 English nouns, grouped by meaning. Each word is given the average color of web images found when searching for that term.[Wattenberg and Feinberg, 2005]

A picture of 33,000 English nouns, grouped by meaning. Each word is given the average color of web images found when searching for that term.

[Wattenberg and Feinberg, 2005]

Color Code is a full-color portrait of the English language.

The artwork is an interactive map of more than 33,000 words. Each word has been assigned a color based on the average color of images found by a search engine. The words are then grouped by meaning. The resulting patterns form an atlas of our lexicon.

[Wattenberg and Feinberg, 2005]

via thedesignweblog

[Wattenberg and Feinberg, 2005] Martin Wattenberg and Jonathan Feinberg, Color Code: A Color Portrait of the English Language, Retrieved at: August 29, 2005. http://loop.aiga.org/resources/loop/loop9/colorproject/index.html

Information Visualization community platform

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Kinder CMP Outdoorjacke - nautico,cmp skijacke günstig,beliebt
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